Friday, 7 August 2015

*Buys Shares In Butterkist*

The continuing revelations of the downfall of Camila Batmanghelidjh’s little vanity project make such entertaining reading.

In typical progressive fashion, she’s spent the last few days lashing out at everything around her like a confused and angry Godzilla trapped in a chintz duvet, and the now-familiar distancing oneself from the imminent wreck (and possible fraud charges) has already begun.

Naturally, the progressive media has been caught flat-footed, unsure whether to cling to its ‘Camila is a saint! It’s all a Tory plot!’ line, or go in with the ‘We had misgivings all along, but she hoodwinked us!’ defence.

It’s about time that attention turned to those supposedly-vulnerable kiddiwinks, isn’t it?
The government is urgently scrambling to find alternative support for 6,000 of the most vulnerable children in the fallout from the closure of the charity Kids Company, the Guardian can reveal.
Who could fail to be moved by their, errrr, plight?
Outside the charity’s premises in Camberwell, south London, Sharlene Reid, 27, who had been supported by Kids Company as a youngster and volunteered there herself, said the street outside had earlier seen protests by parents and children who relied on the charity’s services.
She said: “You just drop the bomb like that and expect people to just move on? There’s people’s lives at stake here, as well as the children. What about them?
“We have to make the government hear us. We were protesting. It was not planned, we all came here because they said it was shutting down, come and collect your things. My friend WhatsApped me this morning and I said, ‘it’s got that bad?’
“Camila has built this up from scratch and she doesn’t take, she just gives. She’s a wonderful woman, all she does is go there [to government] and ask for money to give to the vulnerable.”
A second woman, who declined to give her name but described Kids Company as like “family”, said: “I don’t think Camila is in this to get money. The money she’s got is serious. It’s not even a profit thing. You can’t even get money from this organisation, it’s a charity. I just feel for the children.
You have done it at a bad time. It’s half term now, the children are stuck at home with their parents. Some of those parents have got mental health problems.”
So, to sum up, these ‘poverty-stricken’ parents (who can afford smartphones) are worried that with the demise of this fakecharity, they might have to actually parent their own kids and spend some of their own money, instead of dipping their hand in the taxpayer’s pocket by proxy?

8 comments:

Bucko The Moose said...

"and angry Godzilla trapped in a chintz duvet"

Oh well done. That brightend an otherwise bad day :-)

Lynne at Counting Cats said...

It's clear to me where a large portion of the cash went.

a) down her throat

b) buying an entire week's output from a local cotton mill every time she needs a new frock and ensemble.

Macheath said...

You'd have to go a long way to top 'Godzilla trapped in a chintz duvet'.

It takes a lot of effort to put that look together, at least if an interview I recently unearthed is to be believed:

CB:I don't buy my clothes from shops [...] I have a wonderful lady called Bule and her niece Njomza who between them sew them for me. The staff and the kids at Kids Company bring me all sorts of bits of fabric from everywhere. And then I cut them all up and with Bule we piece them together.

My earrings and headscarves come from Julietta, who is another staff member, and Fatmeh makes my fingerless gloves, so does Azam [a house manager with Kids Company]. I am very lucky, at least once a week someone surprises me with a lovely fabric gift.


I think that sheds a little light on what some of those 600 staff were doing. As for the 'kids' bringing 'all sorts of bits of fabric from everywhere', somehow I can't help thinking of this...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VogHwP0C5VY

Longrider said...

I see that Cameron is defending the government's lack of due diligence in handing over £3m. Thing is, it isn't their money. It's ours.

Anonymous said...

They really are thick as shit round here in Southwark.

They should go vent their spleens at those actually responsible for your demise like that Batmanandrobbingthetaxpayer woman and who DIDN'T pay the other 80% of the money they supposedly needed to keep going.




Ed P said...

Na na na na na na, na na na na na na, Batman!

Corrupt, moi?

JuliaM said...

"Oh well done. That brightend an otherwise bad day :-)"

Glad to hear it! :)

"It's clear to me where a large portion of the cash went."

A forensic accountant would have a field day. And I don't think we've yet heard the worst, either...

"I think that sheds a little light on what some of those 600 staff were doing. "

Good grief!!

"I see that Cameron is defending the government's lack of due diligence in handing over £3m. Thing is, it isn't their money. It's ours."

I always think Cameron can't go down in my estimation, and then, amazingly, he does. It's almost admirable.

Macheath said...

You'd have to go a long way to top 'Godzilla trapped in a chintz duvet'....

I still think so, but you've got strong competition in the Mail comments:

'A cross between Demis Roussos and a fruit salad'.